the various colors of W

“I want to be happy.”

I want/   this is a grasping

to be/      this isn’t now

happy/    this is process               disguised as an outcome

Here   Now 

This is the experience of

what is     as it is    even when    This Is    is    what is   presently absent

and that’s the irony

presently absent/  a hole in the fabric of   what is              my                                      emotional skin

hole/ is “W” gone rogue

whereas the fabric of my personal tapestry

(whole)

strands  I   weave

1st the blue thread

2nd the red

next is shadow, sage, copper, ivory, lemon, lime, apricot, amber, platinum, silver, salmon, chartreuse, vermillion, ochre, teal, amaranth, lavender, spruce, ruby and cerulean

presently    this is/ a shift of awareness

 

 

 

 

only differently coordinated and aroused

 

 

It’s the closing line beneath the line that caught my attention: “only differently coordinated and aroused.”  As statements go, it’s a mouthful.  Like the perfect Crème brûlée, all hot cream and egg yoke jiggling just beneath its crisp of caramelized sugar.  It’s also a poetic reminder that as human beings our bodies and thoughts, our experience, responds and reflects Intent and Purpose.

I can experience the gratification of dance even while it appears that I’m simply walking.


 

From ‘Poetry and Abstract Thought,’ Paul Valéry: An Anthology

“Walking, like prose, has a definite aim. It is an act directed at something we wish to reach. Actual circumstances, such as the need for some object, the impulse of my desire, the state of my body, my sight, the terrain, etc. which order the manner of walking, prescribe its direction and its speed, and give it a definite end. All the characteristics of walking derive from these instantaneous conditions, which combine in a novel way each time. There are no movements in walking that are not special adaptations, but, each time, they are abolished and, as it were, absorbed by the accomplishment of the act, by the attainment of the goal.

The dance is quite another mater. It is, of course, a system of actions; but of actions whose end is in themselves. It goes nowhere. If it pursues an object, it is only an ideal object, a state, an enchantment, the phantom of a flower, an extreme of life, a smile — which forms at last on the face of the one who summoned it from empty space.

It is therefore not a question of carrying out a limited operation whose end is situated somewhere in our surroundings, but rather of creating, maintaining, and exalting a certain state, by a periodic movement that can be executed on the spot; a movement which is almost entirely dissociated from sight, but which is simulated and regulated by auditive rhythms.

But please note this very simple observation, that however different the dance may be from walking and utilitarian movements, it uses the same organs, the same bones, the same muscles, only differently coordinated and aroused.”

of “This statement is false” and other truths

It is said: “Each archetype moves us through duality into paradox,” a movement through polarity that opens and affirms each wealth of contradiction.

 

Something like quantum particles that can occupy different space simulataneously, I thought; only, “There isn’t any wave particle duality because an electron isn’t a particle and it isn’t a wave. Instead it’s an excitation in a quantum field. The electron field can interact in ways that look like a particle and it can interact in ways that look like a wave, but that doesn’t mean it is a particle or is a wave.”

What Is becomes What-Is-at-a-Given-Time-&-(particular)-Context.

 

I am


This Line

Is: statementoftheabsoluteandconsideration

 

Opening the box

From Sol LeWitt: 100 Views

“Everyone gets into their own box and enunciates principles,” LeWitt said in an interview in 2003. “You have your own constraints and your own structure … and then you realize that what you’re saying is ‘I can do this, but I can’t do that.’ And then at some point you say, ‘Well, why not?’ … ‘Every wall is a door.’ “


I read that quote and found myself asking: “What does it mean; how is every wall like a door?”  Considering the image accompanying the quote, I roused this answer:  Art is an expression of life, and my valuation of each (art & life) represents an experience, a perception that I place into the world.  This process of perceiving is a form of interrelatedness, an alchemic intimacy that transforms “this is” into “this is that to me.

What I love about this idea is that what is mine, my perceptions, my experience, is all mine.  I feel empowered.  What I create and place into the world, be that art, an opinion, a kind word, a judgment, each decision is mine to shape.  And the more aware I am of the subtleties, the better able I am to influence my own processes.

I find that when I recognize my own reflection in each stream of consciousness, I can relax into the process and enjoy the flow.  It’s buoyant, and the water’s warm.

It also gets easier with practice.

 

 

 

“It seemed like a wall at first, then like a room, and, eventually, a magnificent architecture of ideas.”

Doing the Unknown

“Doing the unknown”… the idea on the table is Art as Transformational Learning and it’s where my thoughts are this morning.  I want to go on walkabout (locally) and explore the idea in greater detail.

My lazy-day complaint is “I wish it were warmer outside.”  Fortunately, I’m a hearty and resourceful soul; I am well prepared.  I have at Winter Ready layers of cotton and silk, Smart-Wool wool socks, a warm & festive purple velvet hat, gloves, and a coat.  And, of course, a camera.  Today, that’s my mode, my vehicle for exploration.

But what is transformational learning?  It’s a good question and I can sum it up like this:

Transformational learning is: “the process by which we transform our taken-for-granted frames of reference (meaning perspectives, habits of mind, mind-sets) to make them more inclusive, discriminating, open, emotionally capable of change, and reflective so that they may generate beliefs and opinions that will prove more true or justified to guide actions.”  -Mezirow, 2000

How am I/How could you use photography to explore Doing the Unknown (that’s where our transformational learning occurs) just outside the front door, perhaps?  I walk a little further than that and I also have a theme; I notice what I find related to that theme, and then I photograph what I notice.

As neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux discovered, emotion has a privileged position of influence: “our emotional centers get first crack at incoming information, and have the connections to influence the entire brain, including its centers for thought.”  In other words, what I discover while on walkabout is linked to my existing neural response systems, those taken-for-granted frames of reference already mentioned.  That reference system is like a box.  Opening that box is a simple matter, one of exploration.  So…

Let’s go!